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Best Premium WordPress Themes 2018

Best Premium WordPress Themes 2018Linking building and site structure go hand in hand. You might be tempted to only spend your time on building your external link structure but it is also important to not forget about spending time doing something about your internal site structure as well. Best Premium WordPress Themes 2018.

Key Areas of Your Internal Link Building Include:

Footer Links: Your footer is an amazing way to really increase your internal link building. There are many ways you can approach constructing your bottom navigation and it depends on how your site is built but a bottom footer with links to your important pages is a great way to strengthen your internal link building.

This is an example of our footer. You can see we have links pointing to all of our most important pages throughout our entire website. This helps drastically with our internal link building efforts.

Interlinking Pages: Different websites have different ways they achieve this but interlinking pages also strengthens your internal link building. For example, if you have a product or service that is similar to another product or service you can hyperlink a keyword on one page and link directly to the other page of the similar product. This is not only good for internal link building but also user experience. You have now created a quick and easy pathway for a reader to use in order to find another useful service.

Blog: Launching a blog embedded in your website is also a nice way to interlink your website. As you write blog posts and those blog posts bounce around in the search results you can embed hyperlinked keywords to other important blog posts and also service pages in your posts. This could also help your external link building because if someone takes a post you wrote and spreads it through their social channels that could build up new one way links pointing to your website.

Internal link building is very important to the overall success of your website and your long term SEO efforts. Remember that your website is the foundation to everything you do online so make sure your website is 100% efficient.

Best Premium WordPress Themes 2018 – Create a Link Building Program Series

Businesses online are always trying to think of new ways they can generate good quality exposure and great links pointing to their site that could lift some newly found power over to their website and get it really moving around in the search engines. Website owners sometimes have a hard time coming up with something new that simply hasn’t been done online and sometimes it just takes a creative mind. Try putting together a series of videos or blog posts that can be rolled out over a period of time.

A series can be anything, it is important that your website has a blog you could write regarding this link building activity. A series like a company branded toy that each employee has to take home and take photos with or the evolution of a product that can be cataloged and then written about in the company blog. The goal is to get people coming back and possibly writing about your series of events or stories in their business or personal blogs leaving nice links behind to your website or specific event you are writing about. A series like this also shows that you as a business have the ability to showcase a personality. A personality on a business is what allows one company to stand apart from another company in many situations. Sometimes all it really takes is a few brainstorming sessions to put together some sort of blogging series that can generate new eyeballs. Often times you might get someone that has seen your business and not paid much attention to it until they see something like this and all of a sudden see you in a new light.

Link building comes in many different shapes and sizes and all it takes is a little bit of creative thinking. A series of blog posts or videos can also help really strengthen the overall brand. Brand building has no definition; it takes some outside of the box thinking and some real elbow grease but can be done by any business looking to grow. Brainstorm some ideas your business can do a series of blog posts or videos on and watch things change quite a bit for your business in the online space.

Best Premium WordPress Themes 2018 – Recommended Blog Research Techniques

Almost every industry out there has some sort of industry blogs that a business can comment on to help with their link building. It’s very rare that you find an industry without a place to leave any comments even if it might only be a few. There are ways a person can find industry specific blogs if they are uncertain on where to start looking.

Blog Directories: There are many blog directories out there like Blog Catalog or Blogged that showcase some of the best industry specific blogs in any industry. It is a great starting point to start with your research when you are trying to put together a blog commenting campaign.

Blog Rolls: Often times when you find a blog in your industry they might have a blog roll set up to show their audience other industry specific blogs that are relevant. I have come across some blogs that have been known to showcase almost every single important industry blog in their specific field in their blog roll really helping out my research efforts.

Blog Search: As simple as it might sound try just doing a search for your specific blogs in the search engines. See what you come up with. You might just find some of the best blogs to leave comments on directly in the search results. Try doing a web search and also look for keywords in your industry under the actual blog search attached to your favorite search engine. Most search engines will allow you to actually do a blog search right through the engine.

Blog Lists: Use the word “lists” in your search phrases to find others who might have put together a list of your top industry blogs already. Putting together a list of the best blogs in a certain industry can often times bring nice rankings along with traffic so someone in your industry will often times complete the grunt work to find the top industry blogs for you already.

Unless you are in a very tight niche you should be able to find some blogs in your industry where you can leave educated comments on. Just take the time and look around in order to find what you are looking for.

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, . which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

wearecurated.com

Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise to their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So The concern is that there would be which lags behind in

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Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would become dependent on a business with which many also compete for sales. Moreover, the two co-founders also claimed that once ARM was owned by an American firm, Washington could try to block Chinese companies from using its knowhow as part of a wider trade clash between the countries. If ARM becomes a US subsidiary of a US company, it falls under the Cfius [Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States] regulations, Mr Hauser told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme. That means that if hundreds of UK companies that incorporate ARM’s technology in their products, want to sell it, and export it to anywhere in the world including China which is a major market the decision on whether they will be allowed to export it will be made in the White House and not in Downing Street. He added that he believed the pledge to retain and increase the number of UK jobs was meaningless unless UK ministers stepped in to make it legally enforceable. But ARM’s chief executive played down the threat of export bans. It isn’t to do with the ownership of the company, it’s all to do with analysis of the product itself, Simon Segars told the BBC. The majority of our products are designed in the UK or outside the US, and the majority of our products don’t fall under much of the US export control set of rules. Mr Huang added that ARM had some of the finest computer scientists in the world in Cambridge and he intended to both retain them and attract others to what would become Nvidia’s largest site in Europe. The UK prime minister’s spokesman said ministers have spoken to both companies, adding that the government would be scrutinising the deal including what it means for the Cambridge HQ. ARM creates computer chip designs that others then customise their own ends. It also develops instruction sets, which define how software controls processors. It is based in Cambridge but also has offices across the world, including a joint venture in Shenzhen, China. Hundreds of companies license its innovations including Apple, Samsung, Huawei and Qualcomm. To date, ARM says 180 billion chips have been made based on its solutions. When Softbank acquired ARM, it promised to keep the company’s headquarters in the UK and to increase the number of local jobs, which it did. Softbank’s founder Masayoshi Son described the firm as being a crystal ball that would help him predict where tech was heading. But losses on other investments, including the office rental company WeWork, prompted a rethink. California-headquartered Nvidia overtook Intel to become the world’s most valuable chipmaker in July. Until now, it has specialised in high-end graphics processing units (GPUs). These are commonly used by gamers to deliver more detailed visuals, as well as by professionals for tasks including scientific research, machine learning, and cryptocurrency mining. Nvidia is also one of ARM’s clients, using its designs to create its line-up of Tegra central processing units (CPUs). Under the terms of the deal, Nvidia will pay Softbank $21.5bn in its own stock and $12bn in cash. It will follow with up to a further $5bn in cash or stock if certain targets are met. Nvidia will also issue $1.5bn in equity to ARM’s employees. But experts say one risk Nvidia faces is that the takeover could encourage ARM’s wider client list to shift focus to a rival type of chip technology, which lags behind in terms of adoption but has the benefit of not being controlled by one company. ARM is facing growing competition from RISC-V, an open-source architecture, wrote CCS Insight’s Geoff Blaber in a recent research note. If its partners believed that ARM’s integrity and independence was compromised, it would accelerate the growth of and in the process devalue ARM. Mr Blaber also suggested regulators might block the deal. This process will take months if not years with a high chance of failure, he told the BBC. Mr Huang has said that he expects it to take more than a year to educate regulators and answer all their questions, but said he had every confidence they would ultimately approve Softbank made commitments to secure jobs and keep ARM’s headquarters in the UK until September next year. So far, when you read the announcement coming from Nvidia they said they will honour that Softbank has made at the time, said Sonja Laud, chief investment officer at Legal & General Investment Management. But with the expiry about to happen and obviously the Brexit negotiations under way it will be very interesting to see how this develops in the future. This appears to address concerns that British jobs would be lost and decision-making shifted to the US. Last week, the Labour Party had urged the government to intervene. But two of ARM’s co-founders have raised other issues about the takeover. Hermann Hauser and Tudor Brown had suggested ARM should remain neutral, rather than be owned by a company like Nvidia, which produces its own processors. The concern is that there would be a conflict of interest since ARM’s clients would